Tuesday, February 16, 2010

day two of break


hannah has named her louise. the photo is shot through my studio window (and screen), but she has the sweetest little mouth, dainty and a little silly. see her teeth? and she has burdock on her right ear. a scar on her neck. 
this is what became of some of the eucalyptus and one cotton bandana.
leaves removed from stems and laid on wetted sown cotton, folded over once.
bundled up and tied tightly, steamed in a shallow water bath. 
then it rested, and steamed again, after i added more water. also, a bit of washing soda. a flake of red onion skin hanging around.
after sitting on the counter a few days, i could wait no longer.
there are hints of green, gold, rust
this was the somewhat disappointing cloth hanging wet on the window. it is now a bit deeper in color, much yellower, with pink tones. i didn't rinse, not even yet.

this experiment was strange because i used new cotton bandanas that i purchased, pre-washed, but didn't pre-mordant at all. old cottons, especially my favorite old bed sheets, dye so much differently. in any case, i have a bandana with some interest, in the rusty-gold family, with a few pink undertones. all that green? mostly gone. but i'm thinking that, too, may change.

18 comments:

Virginia Burnett said...

I'm intrigued with your leaf and 'found stuff' dyeing experiments. Someday I want to play with vegetable matter but in the meantime, our new barn has tons of nifty rusty items so this spring will see a nice crop of new rust dyed scarves.

Velma said...

hi ginny! have you seen india flint's book? i'm using her work as a guide as i try out doing dyeing the very-much-non-school way. i have a lot to learn.

jude said...

look at that fuzzy beautiful face! wow.
the cloth is gentle. i like it.

Velma said...

she's around all the time now. thanks about the cloth. it would have been so much better on silk...

PiecesofD said...

The deer is so sweet... I wish I lived someplace where wildlife came to my yard. As for the bandana... I like it... I like the subtle colors.

Jeana Marie said...

I love the crackly darker lines on the left of your cloth...like cracks in a sidewalk

Pamela Anne said...

I have been really enjoying your blog. The deer is so sweet. The dyeing is lovely. If you pre-soak your cotton textiles in a 1 soy milk : 5 water for 1 day the cotton fabric will take up more colour. Then repeat the experiment again with the same eucalyptus leaves. They will probably give you lovely colours.

Velma said...

pamela anne, how would a dairy base protein work?

neki desu said...

i second what Pamela suggested. don't know about dairy prot, but suspect that it's the isoflavones in soy.
the eucalyptus looks great.
you have no idea what the top photo means to a city girl :)

neki desu said...

oops too quick, soy also works on silk

Sandra said...

Hi Velma,

I love this lovely deer!
As you can see her from your studio window she must be your muze.
Natural dyeing is a quite surpising enterprise, isn't it. I can guess you might have been disappointed but these subtle colours are also lovely.

Velma said...

my disappointment was with the color change as the cotton dried it changed away from the subtle greens and pinks that are now mere wishes. it can always be overdyed!

Sandra said...

yes, and that's (be overdyed) is the great part!

cbolyard said...

do you do batik?......i tried several with my art classes about ten years ago........i found the crackle appearance that you can get to be interesting...similar to what you did here....

Velma said...

i have done some, though not in along time. it was part of my textile design training.

Pamela Anne said...

I don't know about the dairy proteins, but it is worth a try. You shouldn't need to soak the silk in soy - silk and wool are made from protein fibres -I suggest you buy India Flint's book 'Eco Colour' it is wonderful to read.

Eva said...

That's a very nice, subtle result. Dairy protein should also work, see page 94 and 105 of Eco Colour.

Velma said...

thank you eva!!! i thought i'd read it in eco colour, but i couldn't find it.