Wednesday, February 2, 2011

this thing, the foundling museum

has captured my imagination. maybe because the teens i work with could have been one of these children in a different time and place, and certainly the children of my teens could have been.
you MUST visit this site: http://www.threadsoffeeling.com/
and then you must read jean's blog, posted later today...

26 comments:

aimee said...

wow. of course you would be the one to lead us to this. amazing and poignant.

Valerianna said...

Fascinating, and humbling... so many stories. Visually, I love the beautiful penned notes with the carefully pinned fabric. I could see a whole art installation inspired by this. Its not my project, but someone's, I'm sure!

jude said...

wow

Amanda Muis said...

That is so sad, yet so beautiful. My art history class points this building out as the first piece of neoclassical architecture. I think composer Wagner dropped off a baby or two there.

Gracie said...

It is stunning to think of the mother's or father's work of choosing each of these bits of cloth to accompany their child. The scrupulous record keeping and conservation by the hospital oddly honors that heart broken work. Mind boggling. Thank you for sharing this.

onesmallstitch said...

I started reflecting on this when I received my copy of Selvedge magazine which reviewed the exhibition. It hits very close to home--even with a textile link, I, too have posted it on my blog. The sad thing is the world still doesn't protect ALL of its children.

Velma said...

the question i pose to my students regarding these "early" babies is this: is it fair to the children? not the teen parents, but to the children, their children?
as for this exhibit, i'm sure most of these women giving up their babies were young, in service, or just too poor to make a home for them.

Leslie said...

Very touching. Thanks.

Deb G said...

Very important question for your students to be considering....

What a beautifully sad exhibit.

deemallon said...

what a profoundly beautiful and melancholy exhibit. thank you.

neki desu said...

thank you, very touching.
my guess is that the textiles underlined their love for their babies.
the flip side is here as late as the 60s children were born in catholic hospitals-remember during franco everything was catholic-and were given away by the hospital's personnel to couples in ex$$$change$$$.the mother's were told babies were stillborn.
there are some opened cases now of adults looking for their families.
and then what about children adopted during the argentinian dictatorship?taken away from their mothers undergoing torture and most likely adopted by the torturers.that whole episode in history and its outcome can be a good study case to follow up your question.
sorry this is too long.

Are you curious about me? said...

I am hoping to visit the Foundling Museum to see this exhibition in the next couple of weeks or so, I could pick up some information if your interested and send it to you.

~ Julie

Anonymous said...

What a wonderful post and equally great comments. The exhibition is extremely poignant and has been recieved with great acclaim, thank you for supporting it. The exhibition closes on 6 March. However, part of Threads of Feeling will be exhibted at the Stitch and Craft Show in Olympia, London 17-20 March.
Thank you,
The Foundling Museum

Morna Crites-Moore ~Wicked Waif ~ said...

I do love your little paper weavings. The visit to the Foundling online exhibit was heart-stopping. Thank you for sharing that link.

claire said...

A student of mine went to the exhibition and found it profoundly moving. She brought me back the book to look at. Really a very good read if you can get hold of a copy.

Amanda Muis said...

err. It's classical architecture.
I'm from Nova Scotia, where we had the 'Butterbox' Babies at a birthing house in the 1930's-1960's.

Marilla said...

Beautiful and heart breaking collection. Thank you for pointing me to it. Wouldn't it be wonderful to see it in person?

Clare Wassermann said...

I have really enjoyed leafing through your snowy blog today x

amber dorko stopper said...

i was able to get the printed program for threads of feeling back in october, and i know how meaningful it has been to me, and to other adoptive parents who are also textile artists. wish we were seeing it in person as well. the foundling museum has been really responsive and communicative when it came to all my thoughts and questions and requests, and i have shared the online exhibit with so many people!

Patricia Sahertian said...

this is a very hauntingly beautiful exhibition. nice to see your response to it. it has inspired me to do something too. thanks.

Velma said...

thank you all for going to look.

Sandra said...

you can feel the pain of the parents who couldn't take care of their child.

Barry said...

V-how heart wrenching - so many little ones, so many fragments, maybe so much love tied up with the bits of clothing and fabric. So amazing that someone clipped and kept it as a record. Yet still I'm sad as the pain of letting go seems to just ooze from the fragments.. B

Velma said...

yes, barry, yes. the pain is huge. the letting go, also huge. the extras: the nothings, the foundlings, the children who deserve more. no one wants their child to be such a one. there are many issues here; women must have legal rights over their own bodies.

Anonymous said...

how beautiful, honest and profound thank u for posting the link which i have shared on my facebook page.
i am the child of an unwed mother of 1952, who kept me and loved me but not without the social stigma of the time.
i am that child who had her own pregnancy terminated fearful that she would repeat the same tormented life.
your post has become part of my healing process and i thank you.
thank you.

Velma said...

this is how healing works, and love, it spirals out. so much shame, but healing can result.

Contact Form

Name

Email *

Message *